Brazil Haunted By Its Past Success In World Cup Meltdown Against Germany

Chile had Brazil on the ropes and that was what Germany saw as they knew that the two sides would cross paths at one point in this World Cup. It was a foreshadowing of things to come, although many thought things were on the up and up when they defeated a Colombia side that was suffering from stage fright brought about by the reverence they had for Brazil.  By the time the Colombians overcame that, they were behind 2-0 and the climb just got too steep by then.

Colombia were hit by a barrage of tactical fouls, but they never saw a way out of their predicament until the latter stages of the match.  That, more than the poor decisions by the ref, sealed Los Cafeteros’ fate against the host nation.  For Brazil it was a short-term solution, and that was going to be exposed for the world to see just days later.

At the Mineirão fate, home field advantage, refs or any other types of conspiracy theory was not going to be enough as Germany showed they were in a class all by themselves.  Maybe the final score was not indicative of how much of a chasm there was between the individual players.  The result was more telling of how broken and dependent one team was compared to the collective solidity of the other. Right there you saw the difference between a group of standout players facing a quality team that was a contender since the first day of competition – and didn’t disappoint.

Despite all the energy that Brazil showed in the first few minutes, there was a perception that if Germany were to score, they’d put the home side in quite an adverse situation.  Little did we know how adverse that situation would truly become after just ten minutes.  The first corner of the match for Germany was a blow that the Brazilians were never able to recover from.  It was then when the second came and then the historic third by Miroslav Klose and so on.

This time around the magic of singing the anthem a capella to the top of their lungs and hearing fans sing in unison would not prevent Brazil fans from seeing a total deluge of goals like they have never seen in their lives – or the lives or their grandparents.  No one in Belo Horizonte’s Mineirão, not even the most optimistic German, expect what was about to occur.

When the final whistle, the fans were numb.  No longer was the talk about the quality of Mexican referee Marco Antonio Rodríguez or any other ancillary talking points that were on the table in the days leading up to the game in Belo Horizonte.

The environment wasn’t a funeral; there was no eulogy being given.  There was no closure whatsoever to this situation.  Instead Felipão talked about how the team suffered a big blow against a team that “played better” than them.  What Scolari said made lots of sense. It was all the right things being said by a coach that was just beaten by their rival.

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