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15.8 million watched Women’s World Cup Final in United States

USA’s exciting 2-0 win against Netherlands in the 2019 Women’s World Cup Final generated a viewing audience of 15.87 million across English-language and Spanish-language television and streaming in the United States.

On the over-the-air FOX network and FOX streaming sites, the final delivered 14,271,000 viewers, making it the most-watched soccer match on English-language television in the U.S. since the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup final. On Spanish-language Telemundo and its streaming services, the game delivered a Total Audience Delivery average of 1.6 million viewers ranking as the most-watched FIFA Women’s World Cup match in Spanish-language history, surpassing by 22% the 2015 USA vs. Japan final (1.27 million).

Overall, the TV viewing numbers for FOX’s coverage of the Women’s World Cup Final were impressive but disappointing. In 2015, FOX Sports broke the record for the most-watched soccer game in US television history. While the US women’s team faced more challenging matches in the 2019 tournament with France and England being difficult opponents to overcome, the 2019 competition wasn’t in primetime like the 2015 tournament was.

Compared to 2015, viewership on FOX Sports during the 2019 Women’s World Cup tournament was down 9%. The 2019 final itself was down 43% compared to the US-Japan final in 2015.

Across streaming platforms, Sunday’s match delivered an average minute audience of 289,000 viewers on FOX streaming services, making it the most-streamed FIFA Women’s World Cup final in history, up +402% over the same match in 2015.

Over the entire tournament, Telemundo Deportes set the Spanish-language record for the most-streamed FIFA Women’s World Cup ever, with a Total Audience Delivery average of 301,000 viewers – posting a 27% increase over the full 2015 tournament (237,000 viewers).

When we take into consideration the out-of-home viewing data for those who watched the game in gyms, offices, pubs, restaurants and other venues outside of the home, the viewing figures are more impressive. According to Tunity Analytics, the Women’s World Cup Final averaged 6.9 million out-of-home viewers, making it the second most-viewed soccer game of 2019. The out-of-home numbers for the USA-England semifinal averaged 8.54 million.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Rich

    July 10, 2019 at 4:49 am

    The narcissistic loons in the American World Cup squad were beaten by 14 year old school boys. 15 million viewers is about the size of a big soap opera story in the UK ALONE. It turns out people aren’t interested in weak football played by loud mouthed neurotics.

  2. Marge

    July 8, 2019 at 9:19 pm

    I think the women do a fantastic job. It is a shame they are funded as the men are. It just does not seem right.

    • Robert 1969

      July 9, 2019 at 3:28 pm

      Hate to say it but it is, frankly, the fans fault that the women don’t get the same funding as the men. The men’s World Cup generates $6 billion in revenue for each tournament. But women’s fans don’t pay the same ticket prices and, other than the US they don’t watch on TV around the globe in the same numbers reducing sponsorships and the value of the TV deals for WWC. The result: the Women’s World Cup only generates $131 million for each tournament.

      So, men’s World Cup generates $6 billion while the Women’s World Cup generates only $131 million.

      And the only people to blame for that discrepancy is the fans. They are the problem. This fan-caused discrepancy is why the men get to split $400 million in prize money where the women only get $38 million in prize money. If the women got the same bonus as the men, the women’s tournament would lose $269 million every time it is put on. And that is unsustainable.

      Fan sexism even creates a disparity between men and women at the club level. This year MLS draws an average 20,587 fans per game over a 34 game season. But the women’s league, the NWSL is only drawing an average of 5500 fans per game this year over a 24 game season, Why is that? Well, THAT discrepancy is caused by US fans. .

      Another discrepancy is in television deals. MLS gets $90 million per year in their US TV deals (and they also get media rights fees for internationally televised games. The NWSL’s broadcaster bailed on the deal this year because women’s soccer fans don’t support the sport at the club level and don’t tune in to NWSL games.

      And to understand how horrible it is, MLS is considered to have poor ratings, yet they, at least, double the NWSL’s ratings. The result is that NWSL, to the best of my knowledge, has never received media rights fees.

      Why is it that women’s soccer fans only think Megan Rapinoe is worthy of their attention when she plays in the World Cup, but do. not think she’s worthy of their attention when she plays for the Orlando Pride?

      It’s not enough to be a fan of women’s soccer during the World Cup. The pathway to equal pay is fans showing up to the games even if it’s not a major event. You, as a fan who wants women to make the same amount of money as men, can fix that overnight. If you have an NWSL team in your area go to their games.

      If you don’t have an NWSL team in your area, watch on TV. NWSL just signed a new media rights deal with ESPN, and 14 games will be broadcast for the remainder of this season on ESPN2 and ESPNNews. If ratings are high enough, the NWSL will start receiving a media rights fee equivalent to MLS’s fees. And high ratings will boost the number of league corporate sponsors also helping to eliminate revenue disparities.

      There are more than enough women’s soccer fans in the US to eliminate revenue disparities between MLS and NWSL, which would lead to equal pay between MLS and NWSL players. Now the women’s soccer fans need to show up at the games.

      Eliminating the revenue disparity at the World Cup will require an anti-misogyny revolution across the globe. Fixing that will take longer. But the power to assure equal pay between MLS and NWSL players is in the fans hands. It can be done.

      • Rye Brook

        July 9, 2019 at 4:12 pm

        I think it’s lot more nuanced than you portray but refreshing to see intelligent posts on the subject. Thanks WorldSTalk for doing a great job with this WWC!
        Re. Marge: Your point hits the target. Government has a significant role to play. The USA Title IX 1972 law states: “No person in the U.S. shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” We can see the impact. USWNT is miles ahead of the others. But other governments have wised up & more are committing to boost their programs.

  3. Frank Nali

    July 8, 2019 at 6:13 pm

    The match was refreshing, and congrats to the team. But the standard of soccer by the women is very poor compared to that of the men. However our team looks good because the other teams standard Is also very low. Their passing ability is very poor, and in many occasions the players do not seem to know where their players are positioned or where they dhould be to receive the ball.
    But I still will watch the women play instead of the usa men’s team. As a male, it is just more exciting to watch the women.

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