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International Breaks, Homegrown Players and Bundesliga vs Premier League (This Week In Soccer)

In the fifth episode of This Week In Soccer, we dive into three very meaty topics — international breaks and the roles of club versus country, the issue of homegrown players in the Premier League, and — last but not least — a debate about an article on World Soccer Talk this week regarding whether the Bundesliga is better than the Premier League.

The guests on this week’s episode are:

Laurence McKenna (EPL Talk Podcast host)

Richard Farley (NBCSports.com), and

Kartik Krishnaiyer (Senior Writer, World Soccer Talk).

Subscribe to the World Soccer Talk channel on YouTube. And feel free to share us your feedback on the second episode in the comments section below.

Here are the different ways you can listen to or watch This Week In Soccer:

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About Christopher Harris

Founder and publisher of World Soccer Talk, Christopher Harris is the managing editor of the site. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, The Guardian and several other publications. Plus he has made appearances on NPR, BBC World, CBC, BBC Five Live, talkSPORT and beIN SPORT. Harris, who has lived in Florida since 1984, has supported Swansea City since 1979. He's also an expert on soccer in South Florida, and got engaged during half-time of a MLS game. Harris launched EPL Talk in 2005, which was rebranded as World Soccer Talk in 2013.
View all posts by Christopher Harris →

6 Responses to International Breaks, Homegrown Players and Bundesliga vs Premier League (This Week In Soccer)

  1. gillyrosh says:

    How is a discussion of money tangential to the subject of the international vs club game? Richard, himself, argued for player contracts to be terminated if they get injured playing for their national teams. How is that not a monetary consideration?

  2. gillyrosh says:

    On the subject of comparing leagues, this is tricky. To Kartik’s point about entertainment value vs. on-pitch quality, a comparison is only meaningful if there’s some agreed-upon criteria. What do we mean when we say one league is “better” than another?

  3. Hugo says:

    Man, you amercicans and your money over the game. This was very sad to listen to.

    Hugo (Australia)

  4. Steph K says:

    Still enjoying the format of this new show. I like the pundits and I think they bring up interesting points. Today, I particularly liked the Premier League vs Bundesliga discussion.

    One slight technical thing: I listen to this as a podcast wearing my headphones. Kartik will occasionally shout a response, and it causes physical pain through the headphones. At one point in this video, I almost slipped off of the treadmill in surprise when he shouted out a joke. (Don’t get me wrong, in retrospect, it was hilarious, but while it happened, it was rather terrifying).

    I don’t want to sound like I’m insulting Kartik, whose encyclopedic football knowledge I really respect and enjoy. Just something to be cognizant of going forward.

  5. Cristocrates says:

    It’s a shame Richard Farley’s ego ruined what could have been an interesting discussion. Although Laurence Mckenna handled it well by not responding with the same pettiness.

    You can’t have a discussion of club vs country without considering the political investment and power countries have alongside their economic investment. Just look at FIFA’s attempted ban on high elevation games or Qatar’s huge influence on the modern game. They don’t care about all the money they spend on PSG or the cost of the World Cup.

    Also, to disregard the individual motivations of the players’ is absurd. You can talk about the aggregate interest which is that players really do want, or feel the duty, to play for their national team. This is why nations and FIFA have so much power and the reason nations want this power is because their citizens want to watch their country win. If this wasn’t true we would only have club teams because of the pay. You think with Spain’s economy and political problems they would stand and watch clubs try to strong arm players into not playing. Having Catalan and Spanish players on the same team is way too important. It’s naive to think the modern game is about only money. It’s money and power. Farley wouldn’t let the discussion go anywhere, instead he framed it so he could be right.

    The bundesliga’s success was also influenced by the 2006 World Cup. It brought more financial success and world recognition which allowed them to bring in and keep foreign players which helped shape its style. You also can’t discount the influence of immigrant cultures. It might not be relevant to how we enjoy it but it’s still relevant especially since you just had a discussion on the state of the english game.

  6. Sonu says:

    the discussion if football clubs should include a clause in the contract, that they can cancel the contract if a player gets injured while his duty is absurd. Just imagine there would be such a clause, it would be the death of the national squad and more stupidity would be included in the contract. After the death of FA, the trademark Football will also loose its value and the game becomes more boring.
    Richard could say now …so what, He wants to watch club football only.
    Club football also has many advantages of international football.
    First of all the players get more recognized, so people will buy more his jersey or will pay more attention to his local club.
    Furthermore the players get also international experience and improving a lot. For example I don’t know if Özil and Khedira would have played for Real if they wouldn’t have performed so well in WC 10.
    In adition to both players, you can also say Micheal Owen got pushed due to his WC 98 apereance.
    Dortmund for example had a huge benefit that Shinji Kagawa is from Japan. He got injured badly in his first season though, but because of this player Japan started to be interested in Bundesliga.
    The contract clause is anyway totally stupid and maybe the american way of thinking , but I don’t know how that could work…how many clauses should be included ? For example Leo Messi is involved in a car accident and breaks his leg ? Should Barcelona cancel his contract , because he was in the car and not at home in some super protected area, and ,thus, he provoked his injury. Football is anyway a risky game and clubs knowing that.
    If a player gets the wrong or let’s say risky medical treatment,as it happen with Robben, the FAs already give a compensation. We could discuss if there are too many games for the players, but this a different story.
    Later I will write something about home players.
    I want to apologize for my poor English, I am not a native speaker

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