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How Premier League Clubs Are Fleecing Their Own Supporters With High Ticket Prices [VIDEO]

premier league ticket prices 600x338 How Premier League Clubs Are Fleecing Their Own Supporters With High Ticket Prices [VIDEO]

While there’s been a lot of press this week about Newcastle United and how they’ve been trying to get their opponents to reduce the prices of away tickets in the Premier League, no one seems to be doing anything about the exorbitant cost of tickets to home matches, which is making it difficult for people — especially children — to be able to afford to go to matches.

The New York Times this week created an editorial in the form of a video, which sums up the issue. The rich get richer, but it’s never enough.

Watch this informative video and share your opinions in the comments section below.

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About Christopher Harris

Founder and publisher of World Soccer Talk, Christopher Harris is the managing editor of the site. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, The Guardian and several other publications. Plus he has made appearances on NPR, BBC World, CBC, BBC Five Live, talkSPORT and beIN SPORT. Harris, who has lived in Florida since 1984, has supported Swansea City since 1979. He's also an expert on soccer in South Florida, and got engaged during half-time of a MLS game. Harris launched EPL Talk in 2005, which was rebranded as World Soccer Talk in 2013.
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5 Responses to How Premier League Clubs Are Fleecing Their Own Supporters With High Ticket Prices [VIDEO]

  1. Dean Stell says:

    I dunno…..I tend to view these things economically. Supply and demand…..if you can sell 50K tickets for 50 pounds/each, why charge 40 pounds instead and forego 500K pounds in revenue?

    On the other hand, if the stadiums are selling out, it has always seemed to me that there should be some way to provide a live experience to fans who are willing to pay something, but not willing to pay the whole 50 pounds. If they’re willing to pay 10 pounds and also buy a program and a beer, the club should want that money and find a way to get it. You can’t just add cheap seats to the stadium because then you impact your ability to charge 50 for the existing seats. But, it would seem like some creative mind could come up with something that is cooler than sitting at home, but not as good as the 50 pound seat.

    And part of this just that the EPL’s popularity is a double-edged sword. My local club charges $100 for a season ticket and they still don’t sell out their 3,000 seat stadium. But, they’re also only giving me 4th tier soccer…..no RVPs and Wayne Rooneys out on the field.

  2. Frill Artist says:

    Well, what do you expect? Football tickets are a luxury not a right.

  3. Dust says:

    Americans see sports teams as franchises and not as integral community assets. Football is England’s national game with 92 professional teams in fours divisions, and all up to 20 plus years ago were ALL very much hubs in a community & dependent on local support.

    Before the big sky money tickets were reasonable, for some reason, the more TV money the higher the prices went.

    IMO the ticket prices’s should have been frozen or should be reduced. the atmosphere in the grounds is what adds to the great viewing experience for TV which is where the money comes from.

    Look Woolwich wanderers since moving from highbury to the library the atmosphere has declined even more, at least at highbury it could get a little intense for the derbies, with the kind of crowd that can afford the tickets at the library now you get more fair weather fans that attend. So while they sell the ticket so attendance numbers appear high there is an unhealthy amount of empty seats.(or people wearing tee-shirts with red seats on the front)

    Spurs are too high imo, and you add the ridiculous deal the club did with Stub hub, it is even more of a scam with season ticket holders fleecing other fans for 1000 plus a ticket. Even tho they are shamed in various community forums and the behavior is discouraged by the club, people still do it, because its allowed through Stub Hub.

    Stub Hub is just legalized touting, its a joke and Should be kicked out og the BPL.

    Football clubs in England are viewed as parts of the community not as franchise that can be picked up and moved, (eg. MK Dons and Woolwich Wanderers).

    I can see two sides, Fans want their clubs to compete for trophies and the best players, and not all clubs have sugar daddies, so they have to charge x amount to compete, but some just take the piss, like Farsenal, Spurs, Liverpool, west ham all on top for season ticket prices

    2013 / 14 Season Ticket most expensive

    985 for Farsenal, 9 years NO trophy
    730 for Spurs 9 years 1 trophy (league cup)
    710 for LFC 9 years 2 trophy (champions league and Super cup)
    640 for WHUFC 9 years relegations and promotions, no cups

    Pretty poor esp as these four have been expensive for those 9 years

    Most expensive Match day prices direct from club

    Farsenal for 126
    Chelsea for 87
    Tottenham for 81
    Fulham for 75

    Cheapest match Day ticket Direct from Club (top 4 most expensive)

    Chelsea 41
    Liverpool 38
    West Ham 36
    Swansea 35

    Data from http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2013/jun/19/premier-league-ticket-prices-club-charge-the-most

    Spurs have 30,000 season ticket applicant waiting list, so a new stadium is key, I believe with success on the field it can be made cheaper, the stadium designs show the crowd close to the field which will still give the great WHL atmosphere, but Im concerned the prices will jump to Woolwich levels.

    west ham however, they couldn’t fill it v peterborough in the championship last season, so when they get relegated how will they fill the olympic stadium?

    Anyways, sure there is some banter above, but also reality, right WHUFC?

  4. Michael says:

    The problem with lower-priced tickets: scalping, aka “touts.”

    The “aftermarket” has become HUGE, both here and abroad. Underpricing tickets in a sold-out stadium just to “give something back” will result in more scalpers buying blocks of seats (many even buy season tickets for clubs that sell out) as well as “fans” deciding to finance their seats by selling the matches they don’t want for double, triple or more.

    Barring ways of making sure the fans who originally bought the tickets are the ones attending the matches, pricing tickets to what the market may bear – and thus keeping the profits in the hands of the club, who can theoretically use them to improve the facilities or buy new players – is actually the best solution to this economic dilemma.

  5. Martin J. says:

    One of the biggest casualties of high ticket prices is the home support and atmosphere in the grounds. Compare the atmosphere and support in the Premier League with the lower leagues where ticket prices are still very affordable to the average supporter and teens and you can see the difference. There is more passion from supporters in the lower leagues.

    I think it was Roy Keane who took a swipe at Man United home supporters by calling them the prawn sandwich brigade. He also accused them of being ignorant of the game. These are the type of supporters high ticket prices attract.

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