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The Biggest Difference Between America and Britain: Breakfast

british breakfast The Biggest Difference Between America and Britain: Breakfast

America and Britain are alike in so many ways. I’d argue that as each year passes, the United Kingdom becomes more Americanized. But there’s one thing I haven’t been able to get used to in the States even though I’ve lived here for 28 years of my life. And it has nothing to do with soccer.

It’s the American breakfast.

How can so many things in British and America culture be so similar, yet the most important meal of the day be so dramatically different? It’s left me puzzled all these years.

The bacon? Completely different. Sausages? Different. Toast? Not similar. Americans call jam, jelly. Brits call jelly, jello. And the list goes on and on.

While a British breakfast is a heart attack on a plate, filled with plump pork sausages, thick slices of bacon, fried bread, fried mushrooms, fried potatoes and baked beans, served with a cup of hot tea, an American breakfast can be quite varied in contrast. French toast, pancakes, biscuits and gravy, hash browns, waffles, steak and eggs and so on. All of these American dishes are very foreign to British tastebuds, so it’s no wonder that since I’m very set in my ways, I always look like a deer caught in the headlights when I look at a breakfast menu at any American restaurant.

It gets worse when I go to a deli where there’s an ever greater assortment of strange breakfast choices such as the myriad of bagels, some served with smoked fish or lox.

The only thing I can usually order that is halfway between American and British breakfast food is an omelette, which — funnily enough — is French.

Am I the only one who enjoys American food except for breakfast? Other than making a great breakfast meal at home, have you been able to find that little bit of Britain in America?


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About Christopher Harris

Founder and publisher of World Soccer Talk, Christopher Harris is the managing editor of the site. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, The Guardian and several other publications. Plus he has made appearances on NPR, BBC World, CBC, BBC Five Live, talkSPORT and beIN SPORT. Harris, who has lived in Florida since 1984, has supported Swansea City since 1979. He's also an expert on soccer in South Florida, and got engaged during half-time of a MLS game. Harris launched EPL Talk in 2005, which was rebranded as World Soccer Talk in 2013.
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