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Which Premier League Club Fills The Most Seats In Their Stadium?

arsenal supporters Which Premier League Club Fills The Most Seats In Their Stadium?

We’re at the halfway point of the 2012-13 Premier League season, so I thought I’d share some research in regards to which clubs are doing the best off the pitch in terms of filling up the most seats available in their stadium.

Sure, Manchester United continues to have the largest average attendance by virtue of having the largest club soccer stadium in England. But you may be surprised to find out that the Premier League club who fills most of their seats in their stadium so far this season is not a top four club. In fact, it’s one of the teams in the relegation zone.

The numbers were calculated based on the capacity of the stadium and the percentage of how filled the stadium was based on their average home attendance through December 26, 2012.

First, here are the top 20 teams based on the percentage of their stadium that is filled to full capacity:

  1. Reading, Madejski Stadium, 99.72% filled
  2. Manchester United, Old Trafford, 99.64%
  3. Arsenal, Emirates Stadium, 99.55%
  4. Chelsea, Stamford Bridge, 99.45%
  5. Fulham, Craven Cottage, 99.38%
  6. Tottenham, White Hart Lane, 99.18%
  7. Liverpool, Anfield Stadium, 98.71%
  8. West Ham United, Boleyn Ground, 98.69%
  9. Swansea City, Liberty Stadium, 98.18%
  10. Manchester City, Etihad Stadium, 98.05%
  11. Stoke City, Britannia Stadium, 97.82%
  12. Norwich City, Carrow Road, 97.73%
  13. QPR, Loftus Road, 96.11%
  14. West Bromwich Albion, The Hawthorns, 95.56%
  15. Newcastle United, St. James’ Park, 94.80%
  16. Southampton, St. Mary’s, 92.90%
  17. Everton, Goodison Park, 91.68%
  18. Sunderland, Stadium of Light, 81.81%
  19. Aston Villa, Villa Park, 80.25%
  20. Wigan, DW Stadium, 73.56%

While Reading supporters get picked on by some supporters of larger clubs, here’s proof that they’ve been supporting their team and filling their Madejski Stadium each home game. They’ve also increased their average attendance compared to the 2007-08 season.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, by reviewing the numbers above, you could say that Aston Villa, Sunderland, Everton and Wigan are playing at stadiums that are either too large for their fanbase (or, in the case of Villa, the fans have been voting with their feet by not filling up their stadium).

Second, here are the top teams in the Premier League based on their average attendances so far this season:

  1. Manchester United, Old Trafford, 75,498
  2. Arsenal, Emirates Stadium, 60,095
  3. Newcastle United, St James Park, 52,404
  4. Manchester City, Etihad Stadium, 47,805
  5. Liverpool, Anfield, 45,276
  6. Chelsea, Stamford Bridge, 41,608
  7. Sunderland, Stadium of Light, 40,088
  8. Everton, Goodison Park, 36,816
  9. Tottenham, White Hart Lane, 35,944
  10. West Ham, Boleyn Ground, 34,560
  11. Aston Villa, Villa Park, 34,339
  12. Southampton, St. Mary’s, 30,371
  13. Stoke, Britannia Stadium, 27,138
  14. Norwich, Carrow Road, 26,603
  15. Fulham, Craven Cottage, 25,542
  16. WBA, The Hawthorns, 25,107
  17. Reading, Madesjki Stadium, 24,095
  18. Swansea, Liberty Stadium, 20,373
  19. Wigan, DW Stadium, 18,490
  20. QPR, Loftus Road, 17,782

Teams such as QPR, Swansea, Reading and Fulham are lower in the table because they play in some of the smallest stadiums in the Premier League even though their fans come close to filling their grounds every home match.

What are some of the interesting observations you can point out from the above data? Share them in the comments section below.


About Christopher Harris

Founder and publisher of World Soccer Talk, Christopher Harris is the managing editor of the site. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, The Guardian and several other publications. Plus he has made appearances on NPR, BBC World, CBC, BBC Five Live, talkSPORT and beIN SPORT. Harris, who has lived in Florida since 1984, has supported Swansea City since 1979. He's also an expert on soccer in South Florida, and got engaged during half-time of a MLS game. Harris launched EPL Talk in 2005, which was rebranded as World Soccer Talk in 2013.
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