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Manchester City Signs Samir Nasri For a Transfer Fee Of Around £22million

samir nasri1 Manchester City Signs Samir Nasri For a Transfer Fee Of Around £22million

Manchester City has agreed a fee with Arsenal for the signing of Samir Nasri, the French midfielder. The transfer of Nasri from Arsenal to Manchester City will be completed after Nasri passes his medical.

“Arsenal can confirm that they have agreed terms for Samir Nasri to move to Manchester City,” said a statement on the Arsenal club website. “The 24-year-old midfielder, who has spent three years with the Gunners, has been omitted from Arsenal’s squad which flies to Udinese this afternoon and instead will travel north for a medical.

“The move will be subject to Nasri passing a medical and formal registration processes.”

The signing of Nasri completes a tedious summer of transfer speculation for Arsenal supporters. After the on-again off-again saga of Cesc Fabregas, who ultimately moved to Barcelona, the drama of whether Nasri would leave Emirates Stadium or not has been dragging on for weeks. But Nasri has got what he wants — a lucrative move to Manchester City.

Personally, I feel that Manchester City’s transfer move for Nasri is for two reasons. One, most importantly, to take Arsenal out of the title race and to ensure that Manchester City can have a competitive advantage in the league. By signing Gael Clichy and Samir Nasri this summer, Manchester City have ensured that Arsenal is severely weakened. And two, I see City’s already crowded midfield using Nasri sparingly. If anything, buying Nasri is a move to provide more depth and to help Manchester City with a deep run in the Champions League.

It’s a massive coup by Manchester City to sign Nasri for the above reasons, but it’ll also help the club push forward as they try to knock Manchester United off their perch.

For Arsenal, it’s another worrying sign for the north London club. However, I believe the Gunners will be okay as long as they can pick up three to four quality players between now and the end of the summer transfer window which is quickly coming to a close.

It’s even more worrying for Arsenal supporters when you consider the words that Arsene Wenger reportedly said to The Daily Mirror recently during an interview in July:

“Imagine the worst situation – we lose Fabregas and Nasri – you cannot convince people you are ambitious after that.

“And even if you lose Nasri, to find the same quality player, you have to spend again the same amount of money. Because you cannot say, you lose the player and you do not replace him.

“I believe for us it is important the message we give out. For example, you talk about Fabregas leaving, Nasri leaving.

“If you give that message out, you cannot pretend you are a big club, because a big club first of all holds onto its big players and gives a message out to all the other big clubs that they just cannot come in and take away from you.

“We worked very hard with these players for years to develop them, and now it’s a time for us to keep them together.”

What’s your opinion about Nasri’s move to Manchester City? Share your opinion and analysis in the comments section below.


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About Christopher Harris

Founder and publisher of World Soccer Talk, Christopher Harris is the managing editor of the site. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, The Guardian and several other publications. Plus he has made appearances on NPR, BBC World, CBC, BBC Five Live, talkSPORT and beIN SPORT. Harris, who has lived in Florida since 1984, has supported Swansea City since 1979. He's also an expert on soccer in South Florida, and got engaged during half-time of a MLS game. Harris launched EPL Talk in 2005, which was rebranded as World Soccer Talk in 2013.
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