Bedoya Making Move to Rangers and SPL

5137307665 cbabb81b63 Bedoya Making Move to Rangers and SPL

Photo by The Laird of Oldham

After reports that a deal was off, officials for the Scottish Premier League defending champion Rangers announced today an agreement to acquire American international Alejandro Bedoya, pending successful completion of a U.K. work permit.

Bedoya was an after-thought on the U.S. men’s national team until a Benny Feilhaber injury gave him a spot on the Gold Cup roster.  The Boston College graduate made the most of the chance, playing well in the midfield in the final rounds of the tournament and earning praise from coaches and the media.  The midfielder currently plays for Orebro in Sweeden’s top flight league.

The transfer would be completed in January, as the Swedish league is a spring to fall league, but is far from a done deal as Brian Straus notes.  Due to his lack of international playing time and strict British work permit laws, Rangers will have to petition the government and the league for an exemption.

The move is a great one for Bedoya, who is really beginning to blossom professionally.  If he clears procedural hurdles, he will move to a team that has a spot for him at right midfield and will be paired with fellow American international Maurice Edu.  And while the Swedish Allsvenskan is a decent league, signing with Rangers could allow him to play in the UEFA Champions League if they advance during the fall.

After an impressive Gold Cup run, Bedoya’s stock is rising.  If he can succeed at Rangers, and there’s little reason to doubt he won’t, then he could quickly catapult himself into the Holden/M. Bradley realm of reliable and good-to-great American midfielders.

What do you think?  Good move for Bedoya?

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31 Responses to Bedoya Making Move to Rangers and SPL

  1. MrTuktoyaktuk says:

    Excellent move. When Mo Edu went to Rangers he had a couple rocky, injury filled seasons then substantially improved and became a fan favorite. Bedoya could have a more immediate success IMO.

    • Alex says:

      I feel like Edu was a success at Rangers. albeit he did have injuries plague him. Idk what Rangers see in Bedoya to be honest. he’s not a bad player but i never thought of him as Rangers material. who knows maybe he will become a success at Rangers but i have my doubts to be honest.

  2. CTBlues says:

    ” The midfielder currently plays for Orebro in Sweeden’s top flight league.”
    Sweden only has one ‘e’ unless you were trying to sound like the Swedish chef from Sesame Street lol, but back to article.

    I think this is a good move for Bedoya and I think he does deserve it by the way he played in the Gold Cup.

    I am actually playing a save in FIFA 11 where I am a player/manager for AIK Solna in Allsvenskan and from playing in that I would say they have two good teams in Malmo and AIK Solna and the rest of the league is meh and for some reason they have them play fall/spring schedule. I would equate Allsvenskan to MLS but they get a shot to play in UCL if they get through the early qualification rounds. Also look a European team playing a spring/fall schedule we don’t need to switch to the “rest” of the footballing world. I believe all the Scandinavian countries (Sweden, Denmark, and Norway), Finland, and Russia all play spring/fall schedule.

    • Dave C says:

      I think Russia were pressured into adopting the same calendar as most of Europe as part of the deal to get the World Cup. Which is ridiculous, because for anyone who’s ever seen Spartak Moscow playing in the Champions League during the winter (during what is effectively their off-season), it’s ludicrous. Especially now FIFA has banned snoods. I think I saw Ronaldo wearing a wooly hat once.

      • Preston K says:

        Hello, Charles? Yooho, Charles? Care to comment on soccer? Hmm he probably is still crying his Seattle statistics franchise club lost 7-0 to a overrated epl club. Hmm.

        Anyways Dave C from what I heard the Russian FA (interestingly not the league itself) said they will try the new calendar for a couple of seasons to see if it will stick. They claim its to be in the same frame as other top euro clubs but now that you mention FIFA it could be that. Which would explain why Joseph blatter said any country wanting to host the world cup has to have pro rel and be on the international calendar and why at the last minute garber said we would simulate pro rel and monitor Russia to be if it would work only to scrap it after we lost. But Idk its all politics and money.

        • Dave C says:

          Charles probably won’t comment, because it’s not directly related to MLS, and I’ve noticed that he rarely ever responds to any one who addresses him directly. He just comes on here to boast about how he is the truest MLS fan, and every one else is a eurosnob, euro-idiot, eurobogyman or whatever.

          If he DOES come on this thread, he’ll take the same strawman approach he did when Freddie Ljungberg went to Celtic. He’ll say something along the lines of:

          Rangers are a massively successful and respected European giant (which is the part that is not really true).
          Bedoya was average in MLS
          Therefore, if an average MLS player can sign for a respected European giant club, then MLS must be on a par with the great leagues of Europe.

    • BamaMan says:

      Denmark, who has by far the strongest and most profitable league in Scandinavia, plays a fall-spring schedule with an extra long winter break. It was actually following the Danish Superliga for a couple seasons that convinced me that the fall-spring schedule is the way to go for MLS. By and large, it has been a boon for league profitability, Danish players in international competitions, and for Danish teams in European club tournaments. Russia is making the same switch although I imagine they’ll have an extra long winter break as well.

      • Alan says:

        The Royal League takes a 2 month break during the winter. Denmark has a 30 degree absolute average low during one of the months that they take a break. Columbus has an absolute low of 20 degrees. Columbus gets a lot more snow. But then again I guess they can just play on the road the whole time. So, taking a 2 month break changes things by a month? Seems hardly worth the effort. Taking just a month off only is just stupid.

        • BamaMan says:

          First, please get your facts right. The Royal League is an old abandoned knockout cup between teams from the various Scandinavian countries. Denmark’s top domestic league is the Danish Superliga.

          But you’re right. It’s stupid that Denmark scheduled their league to maximize TV revenue and protect the value of the World Cup. It’s stupid that the last tv deal for a 12 team league in a country the size of Alabama was worth $210 million US, an amount the MLS would kill for.

          A couple honest questions:

          Do you think the US should stop playing the winter WCQ against Mexico in Columbus? Apparently the weather is such a turnoff that no one, especially not Americans fans show up, right? And, if the Russian Super League makes it work, will you abandon this argument? Because I promise you their winters are worse than those in Columbus.

          • Alan says:

            We are not a nation that has the same passion for soccer as any of these leagues. Who cares what they do in Russia? They are looking at taking a long winter break anyway. We can work around the international calendar with a summer schedule without making people freeze their butts off. As far as WCQ matches there, we don’t have to have games there. I am not sure why they need to. Having a 2 month winter break is pointless. Having a 1 month winter break is not enough. One of the arguments against UEFA having a summer schedule is the effect it will have on the United States trying to have a winter world cup and how all of the games would have to be held in the south. Why? Because it is a stupid idea by people trying to push the same old agenda. To say that switching to a winter schedule will give us a TV deal for a sport that isn’t even that popular is far fetched. Keep pushing your agenda. I’m done arguing and it is just pissing me off. Hopefully you get nowhere with it, which I am sure you will.

          • BamaMan says:

            The fact that you don’t know the history of why the US plays WCQ games against Mexico in Columbus in the winter tells us all we need to know about your level of knowledge on this issue.

          • Alan says:

            Because it has nothing to do with league play. There is no knowledge needed. Just common sense, which explains a lot about why you can’t understand why it is a stupid idea, unless maybe you have an Apertura and Clausura. Taking 3 months off is stupid, which is what you’d need to do to combat the crazy snow storms you get in Toronto, Chicago, and Columbus. Either that, or constantly reschedule. Brilliant. Again, Alex Ferguson and Arsene Wenger want to reschedule to spring-fall. I guess they are just know-nothings. But hey, they have a world cup qualifier every 4 years in Columbus, so that means league play makes perfect sense. Oh, and Russia and Denmark do it too. It HAS to work for us too.

          • BamaMan says:

            Bottom line: the most profitable leagues play an August-May schedule. Americans have demonstrated that they will show up in droves to games no matter the weather if the product on the field is good. Two coaches wanting what’s best for their own teams doesn’t mean it’s what’s best for the EPL as a whole, much less the MLS.

            The MLS, as a TV property, has become less popular over the past decade. The USMNT, as a TV property, has exploded in popularity over the last decade. Why would the MLS NOT look at some of the things the USMNT have done?

            The MLS is in much worse shape going forward than you seem to realize. According to Garber himself, their biggest source of revenue is gate money and most teams are not profitable. They only get $500K per team per year from TV, and that is mainly due to the the WFC and Man U in the All-Star game. Who knows what they have to give away in appearance fees to get that. They depend on the promise of a new $50m+ franchise “expansion” fee every few years to keep the lights on. Their business model right now is basically a ponzi scheme. They HAVE to make themselves a more viable TV property in order to get on solid ground financially. You can stick your head in the sand all you want, but as long as the MLS opens their season against March Madness and closes their season against the heart of college football/NFL season, casual fans are not going to check it out. So long as MLS plays head to head with the WC, Gold Cup, and the WFC, diehard soccer fans are going to check out those events instead. And as long as MLS is not drawing in casual sports fans or diehard soccer fans, they are going to struggle to remain viable. I posited a solution to that problem. I’d be curious to hear your solution on how to get MLS on sound financial footing.

          • BamaMan says:

            The MLS is in much worse shape going forward than you seem to realize. According to Garber himself, their biggest source of revenue is gate money and most teams are not profitable. They only get $500K per team per year from TV, and that is mainly due to the the WFC and Man U in the All-Star game. Who knows what they have to give away in appearance fees to get that. They depend on the promise of a new $50m+ franchise “expansion” fee every few years to keep the lights on. Their business model right now is basically a ponzi scheme. They HAVE to make themselves a more viable TV property in order to get on solid ground financially.

            You can stick your head in the sand all you want, but as long as the MLS opens their season against March Madness and closes their season against the heart of college football/NFL season, casual fans are not going to check it out. So long as MLS plays head to head with the WC, Gold Cup, and the WFC, diehard soccer fans are going to check out those events instead. And as long as MLS is not drawing in casual sports fans or diehard soccer fans, they are going to struggle to remain viable. I posited a solution to that problem. I’d be curious to hear your solution on how to get MLS on sound financial footing.

          • Alan says:

            If you actually read anything I said, you’d know.

            1. Get rid of pointless friendlies.
            2. Keep the All-Star game if you must.
            3. Start the season a couple of weeks early and end it a couple of weeks later.
            4. With this extra time, take off time for the World Cup, Olympics, Gold Cup, etc. This is a month or less.
            5. Also, with the extra time, respect the international calendar and take time off for International US friendlies. Hold an occasional mid-week game if necessary.
            6. Make the US Open Cup mean more. Have it on the weekends if possible and get it on TV. Have it mean something to the fans and to the team. Make it more important to win than a CCL spot until the CCL gets bigger. Oh, and get rid of play-in rounds. Make it an open where at least the top 3 tiers have ALL of their teams play.
            7. Make CCL mean more. Air it on TV, advertise it, get the word out on the importance of the tournament. Both the US Open Cup barely get mentioned. Find ways to make them mean more. This will probably take more time.
            8. Start the season (probably March 1 timeframe) with a SuperCup similar to what they do in Italy. The first game of the season is a cup competition between MLS Cup winner and Supporters Shield winner. If they are one in the same, make it the Supporter’s Shield runner-up or something.
            9. Find better ways to encourage regional rivalries. Maybe that would be playing within the conferences more, or maybe actual cup competitions during the season between regional rivals. Does that even go on right now, because if it does, I sure haven’t heard of it. That is part of the problem.
            10. Work with WPS to expand. This wouldn’t do much at first, but overall it would grow US soccer. Imagine LA Galaxy women or Seattle Sounders women (or insert your favorite team here) playing in WPS with world-class women players. The Women’s market would be great to get into because there is not really a dominant league or continent in the world yet like Men’s soccer. Get the talent to come here. The key is making soccer bigger in the US other than just world cup fever.
            11. Work with NASL. Overall this will be good for US Soccer, MLS, and NASL. Soccer needs to be in more cities, and if we are stuck at 20 teams like FIFA want this is the only way to make it happen. MLS helping to build up NASL will be good for MLS, and a stable second division might even lead to pro/rel or something years down the road.
            12. More TV deals. Make MLS more accessible. Sure, they are on local TV channels. Those of us in areas like Detroit get 1 or 2 games a week. Maybe having multiple TV deals is the answer. Get some games not on ESPN or FSC on Versus or something that anyone can watch if possible.
            13. Fix some things with MLS. Have a 2-legged MLS Cup, or at least make rankings mean something like where they hold the MLS Cup. Have smaller play-offs, like 6 to 8 teams MAX.
            14. Improve quality even more. Focus on development, youth, academies, etc. Make it a priority. Raise the salary cap more than they have been. Bring in more talent without turning the league into a 2 team league like EPL and La Liga. As ALL teams improve, so will viewers.

            This stuff is a start. It is going to take a lot of time to make a soccer league extremely popular here in the US. Are the things listed above going to solve everything? Of course not. It is a start, and it won’t damage the league like having December-February matches in the snow. Personally, I think in a country like the US you have to have more than 20 teams in the league, but since FIFA hates that so much I doubt it will happen. Without more teams in more places for people to care more, non-MLS markets are not going to care. The NASL will be a start. Get cities like Detroit, San Diego, Phoenix, etc in the soccer mix and MLS will get more fans. No matter what, it will take time.

  3. Joe Rambo says:

    Yo I’m mad confused. If Bedoya is joining the Glasgow Rangers, why does the scarf have an England flag on it?
    Braveheart won, limeys! Scotland isn’t your property any more!

    • Preston K says:

      From what I know (any real brit out there correct me)

      A. Scotland is still part of the United Kingdom

      B. Despite mixed feeling politically, clubs are a extension arm to politics and religion (isnt Celtic predominantly catholic and rangers protestant?) Anyways Rangers fans have always been royalist, meaning loyal to the British crown.

      Club history, especially when clubs are tied to other aspects of history, is always interesting.

      • CTBlues says:

        A. Scotland is part of Great Britian (England, Scotland, and Wales). It is also part of the United Kingdom which is the same as Great Britian but adds Northern Ireland.

        B. Celtic was started by Irish immigrants who left Ireland to find work in Scotland so they were a “catholic team” and Rangers were Scottish thus protestant, but I don’t know about the because they protestant they were loyal to the crown. I think they wre loyal to the crown because they are Scottish. I can’t see the picture because my work is blocking the sourse so I can’t comment on the flag. From your descritions though it is probably the Union Jack which is the flag of Great Britian not the United Kingdom.

    • Preston K says:

      BTW that isn’t englands flag, that’s the UK flag which technically is Scotlands flag too. Think of it as state flags are to the American flag

      • Dave C says:

        Preston – you’re spot on. I have to admit, “Joe Rambo” was actually just a psuedonym of mine. I was doing some harmless trolling to see what the responses would be. I was expecting a bunch of badly-informed people to jump up to support Joe Rambo’s view.

        You might actually be surprised, but I’ve known even fairly well educated, worldly Americans who don’t understand the whole UK thing, and say things like the above. And they also tend to treat Braveheart as some kind of totem of Scottish identity.

        Since you corrected “Joe Rambo” straight away, I figured there was no point in keeping up the act.

        You’re right: The flag the Union Flag/Union Jack is the flag of the United Kingdom (including Scotland, England, Wales and N. Ireland). It’s made up of elements of the flag of England, Scotland, and obsolete flag of Ireland. I’m not sure why Wales doesn’t get any representation (maybe the Gaffer can weigh in on this if he’s reading), but perhaps a dragon was just too hard to incorporate into the design).

        And you’re right about Rangers/Celtic. Celtic was a club founded by Irish immigrants to Glasgow, and as such has always had a generally Catholic, Republican (as in the Irish sense of the word) association. Rangers (presumably in reaction to this) have been the opposite.

        • Clampdown says:

          That’s OK, Dave. An English friend of mine didn’t know the difference between the UK and Great Britain. I straightened it out for him. Ha.

          • Dave C says:

            That’s shocking, but unfortunately we have our fair share of stupid people in the UK :(

        • Charles says:

          “Joe Rambo” was actually just a psuedonym of mine. I was doing some harmless trolling to see what the responses would be.”

          Oh my, you really need to quit hanging with the morons. Just what this site needs is more trolls.

          • Dave C says:

            Charles,
            Is “Charles” the psuedonym of a secretly reasonable person who’s just doing this “MLS, rah rah rah” thing for giggles?

        • BamaMan says:

          I think it’s a good fit. SPL, especially the Old Firm, is of a higher caliber than the MLS but it has the same physical style that MLS and EPL share. It might even give Bedoya a platform for eventually getting picked up by an English side.

        • Matthew says:

          Dating back to the time of Edward I when Edward incorporated Wales political with England, Wales has historically been connected to England. Hence you have the first Prince of Wales, the future Edward II being created in 1301. Wales never had their own parliament like Scotland did until 1707 when the Act of Union merged the Scottish parliament with Westminster and Ireland lost their parliament under the Act of Union in 1801. In addition more acts were passed during the reign of Henry VIII and George II to further strengthen the political and legal connection between the two. Before 1921 (having the republic and the creation of Northern Ireland), the separate nation flags of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland represented their patron saints, George, David, Andrew, and Patrick. Of course things have changed with the creation of a new Scottish parliament and Welsh Assembly. I hope that addresses some the questions.

  4. ExtraMedium says:

    What? An MLS team wouldn’t give an American not named Landon a DP contract? Who could’ve predicted that?

    • Alex says:

      First off any American who played in foreign leagues get put into the allocation list so its not like a mls club gets a chance to bid for him and second more money and better quality of play and more money exist over seas . I think more quality Americans should start re enforcing mls teams but if more money and better quality exist elsewhere and mls are not allowed to compete for players unless they have a dp slot then I dont think prominent Americans will stick around.

      By the way I hate how mls refuse to sell his contract with everton or any other club only to imprison him just to make money off his name. He’s barely being paid dp money. And I notice his decline performance wise. Mls cartel sickens me.

  5. Charles says:

    I agree with ExtraMedium, probably not, but I might.

    Bedoya will do fine.

    MLS needs to sign these type of players.
    My opinion is less DPs and bigger cap space would have accomplished this, obviously Bedoya is going to go for the $$$, figure out a way to get it done.

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