Using The Full Squad (Mid-Week Review, Weekend Preview): EPL Talk Podcast

EPL Talk Podcast Logo draft 300x242 Using The Full Squad (Mid Week Review, Weekend Preview): EPL Talk PodcastThe English Premier League put two more clubs through to the quarterfinals of UEFA Champions League, with mid-week action seeing Manchester United and Chelsea qualify for the final eight. They join Tottenham Hotspur, who beat Milan last week, by sending Marseille and Copenhagen home.

On this edition of the EPL Talk podcast, myself and my co-hosts – Laurence McKenna and Kartik Krishnaiyer – discuss the typical mix-bag from United and the underwhelming display from Chelsea, considering which of their fellow quarterfinalists United and Chelsea will want to avoid, want to draw. We also consider the potential of Spurs. Now that we’ve seen the knockout round performances of the eight surviving clubs, how far can Spurs go in their first Champions League?

We also discuss Jens Lehmann, Michael Jackson, Alex Ferguson and the Europa League fates of Manchester City and Liverpool before looking toward the weekend slate, 10 matches highlighted by the Citizens’ trip to Stamford Bridge. Would Roberto Mancini be better served focusing on Sunday’s match? Or does he have the squad to continue competing on three fronts?

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13 Responses to Using The Full Squad (Mid-Week Review, Weekend Preview): EPL Talk Podcast

  1. BC says:

    To be honest, i’m quite amazed at some of the poor analogy and logical fallacies that takes place in this podcast. I’m only gonna point out 2.

    1) Fergie talking to MUTV is the equivalent of an interoffice memo? You’ve GOT to be kidding me? The counterfactuals of “if it didn’t come out, would it still have mattered” is the entirely irrelevant. Fact is, it came out. MUTV is part of the media, and therefore public consumption. Fergie talking to MUTV is much more akin to Apple quarterly conference call. It’s available to the podcast, anyone can potentially get it.

    2) You can question referee’s decisions, you can even say that the decision was a joke. But you cannot question whether the referee is biased for or against any team. Fergie got brought up on charges where he questioned the integrity of the referee when he said that “you want a fair referee”. Clear and simple. As far as I know, that’s the key thing that they brought the charges on.

    I don’t understand how Kartik can possibly use the excuse of “other people are doing it too” to say that is unfair punishment. Because while managers questions the decisions of referees, or say “the ref didn’t have a good game today”, I implore you to find me an example where managers have crossed this line and escaped charges. You can agree with many of the things Fergie said about the ref for that particular game, but can you agree that the ref was intentionally biased against manu or in favor of chelsea?

    It’s not about whether you agree with 99% of what Fergie said Kartik, it’s the 1% where he crossed the line that got him in trouble.

    • BC says:

      Oh, I was going to add that even if you can find examples of other managers questioning the integrity of refs and someone gets overlooked. That’s not an actual argument that Fergie shouldn’t be punished, rather that’s evidence to the argument that others ought to be punished as well. I.e. Just because every murderers are not brought to justice doesn’t mean that the murderers who are caught and convicted should be free because you didn’t punish every murderers out there.

      • Richard Farley says:

        Great points. One little qualm, however:

        To be honest, i’m quite amazed at some of the poor analogy and logical fallacies that takes place in this podcast.

        The tone here could be much better. A lot of people consider the EPL Talk podcast to be this highly opinionated space where we talk about things other podcasts don’t, which is great but I often wonder why that it. This comment reminds me. Perhaps it’s because somebody can’t say something, be wrong, without somebody commenting in a way that, rather than engaging in the discussion, seems a bit over-the-top?

        If you and I were having a chat in a bar, and I said the office memo line off the top of my head, and you corrected me, I would say, “Oh, that’s true,” and we would move on. Neither you nor I would think much of it because these things happen. You say something to somebody, you work through it through discourse. In a lot of ways, that’s what discourse is all about.

        And while in this forum it makes sense to outline your case, the statement “i’m quite amazed at some of the poor analogy and logical fallacies that takes place in this podcast” is unfair. This all comes down to your perception of MUTV. Your perception is one. Mine is another.

        I’m not sure who is right because club-sponsored media (I’m not even sure you can call it media) is a relatively new phenomenon, one which we are coming to grips with through incidences like these.

        I suppose this is about disagreeing without being disagreeable. Yes, that old maxim, one that seems irrelevant in this medium. Amplitude and attitude, nor moderation and consideration, right?

        Your points are good, but I found your initial statement to be a bit of an exaggeration and an over generalization.

  2. Cillian says:

    Man Utd just beat Marseille and Kartik put them as favourites? $9.00 on odds.
    I don’t think you should write off Real Madrid if they don’t come up against Barcelona too early.
    MUTV has massive viewership. Richard Farley you missed the point on this one this is media not a private memo.

    • Richard Farley says:

      Because MUTV has massive viewership, it’s media? Maybe that’s right. I don’t know. I don’t like that definition, though. It ends up labeling a number of things as media, things which never intended to be so. MUTV has massive viewership and broadcasts. Those qualities also apply to WWE. I would say that MUTV’s intention is in line with the wrestling product. They’re trying to provide entertainment content to an opt-in, biased group.

      • Dave C says:

        MUTV may be an opt-in service, targeted mostly at a pro-Man Utd audience, but I don’t think that gives Fergie carte-blanche to say what he likes on the channel.

        He has to know that MUTV is also received by journalists, critics, bloggers etc, and so anything he says on it is likely to be broadcast to the general public. I’m no legal expert, but I think there is some kind of principle of reasonably foreseeable consequences here. If he could somehow screen the audience to ensure that only loyal Man Utd fans were watching, then he could get away with saying whatever he liked. But he can’t, so he has to expect that anything he says will be spread further, and therefore I think he has the responsibility to behave within the FA’s guidelines.

        • Richard Farley says:

          In addition, no matter how much I would like to think that the FA can’t just keep extending its reach to the point that they’re influencing more and more of the thoughts, feelings, and conclusions we hear from managers and players, I think Ferguson knew what he was doing when he opened his mouth.

          He had to know his comments would draw the ire of the FA. Obviously, he would have like those comments to have never gotten out, but that seems a post-hoc rationalization. I see as if, in the moment, Ferguson deems himself above these rules for which he has little regard.

          The punishment stinks, IMO, but Ferguson should have also known it likely the moment he opened his mouth. We should have brought that up yesterday. Ferguson’s act was selfish, not consistent with helping the team, no matter how misguided the FA’s policies.

  3. Cillian says:

    This is such a gang up on Lawrence, he has a point.
    Man City should be able to comfortably field another 8 players as a second XI who could be a mid table side in the Prem.
    Kartik is terribly biased.

    • Richard Farley says:

      We don’t disagree with Laurence, necessarily. We disagree with applying that standard to City and not looking at, say, Manchester United, who had no criticisms lobbed at them for choosing to prioritize Marseille over Arsenal.

      • Cillian says:

        That standard is applied to Tottenham and they are doing well to keep the balance.
        Man City are playing very underwhelming football at the moment and I am just struggling to find a real heart of the Man City team. The team seems like a collection of mercenaries not bought to play to a game plan but just because they can.
        Looks like a clear example of the sum of players talent being more than the whole.

        Good debate though, you lads are opinionated which makes it interesting and different to other discussions where everyone talks along the same media lines.

        On another point Alex Ferguson had 2 matches suspended sentence aaaand he appealed the decision. This fiasco is mainly of the Scots ego doing.

  4. Erich B. says:

    Great debate at the end of the podcast.

    While I don’t always agree with the opinions that are conveyed on the podcast, I do appreciate you guys taking time out of your lives to do the podcast twice a week.

    • Richard Farley says:

      Thanks, Erich! That’s good to hear. Given the fact that nobody can be right about everything, I tend to think that if you don’t disagree with us every once in a while, odds are we’re holding something back. Hopefully we always have room in our opinions for each others and yours.

      Thanks.

    • The Gaffer says:

      Erich, in the next week or two, EPL Talk Pro will be recording a Roundtable discussion where Richard, Laurence and Kartik will take a deep topic and debate it. EPL Talk Pro info is at http://epltalk.com/epltalkpro

      Cheers,
      The Gaffer

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Using The Full Squad (Mid-Week Review, Weekend Preview): EPL Talk Podcast

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The English Premier League put two more clubs through to the quarterfinals of UEFA Champions League, with mid-week action seeing Manchester United and Chelsea qualify for the final eight. They join Tottenham Hotspur, who beat Milan last week, by sending Marseille and Copenhagen home.

On this edition of the EPL Talk podcast, myself and my co-hosts – Laurence McKenna and Kartik Krishnaiyer – discuss the typical mix-bag from United and the underwhelming display from Chelsea, considering which of their fellow quarterfinalists United and Chelsea will want to avoid, want to draw. We also consider the potential of Spurs. Now that we’ve seen the knockout round performances of the eight surviving clubs, how far can Spurs go in their first Champions League?

We also discuss Jens Lehmann, Michael Jackson, Alex Ferguson and the Europa League fates of Manchester City and Liverpool before looking toward the weekend slate, 10 matches highlighted by the Citizens’ trip to Stamford Bridge. Would Roberto Mancini be better served focusing on Sunday’s match? Or does he have the squad to continue competing on three fronts?

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