Sign up for the free World Soccer Talk daily email newsletter for TV schedules, news and more »

THURS, 1PM ET
CAG
JUVE
THURS, 2PM ET
ATL
HOS
THURS, 3PM ET
NAP
PAR
THURS, 4PM ET
ELC
VAL
THURS, 4PM ET
MAL
COR
FRI, 2:45PM ET
VIGO
ALM

Real Madrid's Proposed January Transfer Bid for Gareth Bale Would be a Step in the Wrong Direction

 Real Madrid's Proposed January Transfer Bid for Gareth Bale Would be a Step in the Wrong Direction

According to reports scoured across the Internet, Spurs boy wonder Gareth Bale is the subject of a potential Real Madrid transfer bid this January. Should the Spanish giants make a move for the Welsh winger, Tottenham and Harry Redknapp would be foolish to let their young prized possession leave White Hart Lane regardless of the transfer fee involved.

Bale is currently among a crop of players in the Premier League who can be described as one of the league’s best, but would a move to Madrid in Spain’s La Liga remotely fit Bale? Reports suggest Real Madrid manager Jose Mourinho is a big fan of Bale’s abilities, yet where would Bale fit in at a club such as Real Madrid?

For a myriad of reasons, he wouldn’t. Among a few: the language, settling into a new country, new league and new system all would be major adjustments for such a young player who has only just settled in England in the past twelve months.

But paramount in those reasons is that Madrid are always a loaded club with enough players to field two solid teams. Bale could realistically languish on the bench for the majority of league play while his chances to play in cup competitions throughout the year would be few and far between. There’s no guarantee Bale could get the kind of minutes he now enjoys at Spurs. While Bale’s stock continues to rise and the big European guns load their barrels for his services, he and those around him must remember that the grass isn’t always greener.

Proponents of a transfer to Spain would state that although Madrid are big spenders and can field world class talent at more than one position, quality and depth at left back, a position Bale could play, seems to have eluded the Spanish giants in recent years, at least in their eyes.

Marcelo and Alvaro Arbeloa have both deputized at left back with moderate success since the club have looked to replace the massive hole Roberto Carlos left upon his departure in 2007. Gabriel Heinze also enjoyed a stint at left back for Real Madrid before leaving for French club Marseille in 2009. For those who follow Spanish football, a quality left back, or lack thereof, is often stated as just one in a number of reasons why Madrid have failed to capture success in Europe in recent years.

Bale, just 21, surely has to be happy with his current situation. He’s got Champions League and first team football with Spurs, and with the recent addition of Dutch play maker Rafael van der Vaart among other talented Spurs, most importantly, he’s at a club with ambition.

Gareth Bale to Madrid makes about as much sense as a young and promising Spanish player such as Sergio Busquets or Pedro leaving Barcelona for Chelsea or Manchester United to begin again. Although Tottenham can’t realistically be compared to Real Madrid in terms of their impact on European football, or sensibly be compared to the success of Manchester United or Chelsea domestically or in Europe, Bale has what he needs at 21 and will continue to gain the valuable experience he needs to further his development if he simply stays put.

Bale’s abilities, fitness, mental toughness and focus will certainly be challenged this season in the Champions League and domestically while Spurs continue to fight for their hold on fourth. He’s the epitome of a Premier League player with his strength, skill and speed. At least for the time being and while Spurs can match his ambition, he’ll due perfectly fine to stay just where he’s at.


This entry was posted in General, Leagues: EPL. Bookmark the permalink.