Time To Replace Bob Bradley But Who Should Get the USMNT Job?

 Time To Replace Bob Bradley But Who Should Get the USMNT Job?

Bob Bradley, as coach of the United States men’s national team, has done a heroic effort by taking the country to the final of the Confederations Cup in 2009 and leading the US to an admirable Round of 16 qualification this summer in the World Cup. Bradley has nothing to be ashamed of and has done wonderfully well with what he has.

But it’s time for the United States Soccer Federation to move on and select a new coach to replace Bradley. Someone who can take the United States further and make them into a major soccer power on the world’s stage. Bradley has taken the team as far as he can take them. It’s time for a new person to step in and build on the foundation that Bradley has built.

The next few months are key for the USSF. They have an opportunity to make a decision that will have an impact on the next decade in American soccer. There is the perfect coach who is sitting right under their noses if only they would take notice.

He is the man who is absolutely perfect for the position. And the perfect time to hire him is now.

That person is…

…Jurgen Klinsmann.

The former manager of the German national team is no stranger to American soccer. He lives in California with his family and has lived in this country since 1998 after his playing career ended. He has worked closely with the Los Angeles Galaxy. And he is smart enough to look at other sports outside of soccer to understand how sports psychology, coaching and medicine can benefit soccer. It’s no surprise then that Klinsmann follows basketball very closely, just as one example of many American sports.

There are so many reasons why Klinsmann should be the one and only logical choice to select him as coach. Here are just a few:

  1. The US men’s national team has a lot of raw talent, but Bradley hasn’t been able to take that raw talent and turn it into a well oiled machine. Klinsmann has the experience at Germany and Bayern Munich as well as a professional player in some of the top leagues in the world to know how to do it,
  2. Klinsmann isn’t afraid of making significant changes, when needed. When he took over the German national team in 2004, he was heavily criticized for making drastic changes. But those changes, such as bringing in a lot of youth, worked well in 2006 and paid dividends in this current 2010 World Cup campaign,
  3. There’s a lack of style and philosophy with the US men’s national team. And Klinsmann is exactly the person who can make the team more cohesive and have it play a particular style that is uniquely American. Right now, and for several years, it seems that the only way the United States knows how to play is a counter-attacking style under a 4-5-1-. But I don’t believe it’s been a very effective system. Plus, it hasn’t gotten the best out of the players. When you see the United States play, it’s often difficult to know which team will turn up. They need that vision that Klinsmann will undoubtedly share. A vision that everyone believes in and understands.
  4. Klinsmann has first-hand knowledge of the system that turned Germany from an embarrassing team in the early 2000′s to one of the best in the world in just one decade. It’s imperative that the USSF takes advantage of his knowledge and tries to figure out how they can institute, where applicable, the German system into America,

The USSF missed a golden opportunity in 2006 to capture Klinsmann as coach of the United States. Now it has another opportunity to approach him if they play their cards right. Bob Bradley should be congratulated for everything he has done, but it’s time for one of the best soccer minds in the world to take the United States to the next level and hire Jurgen Klinsmann.

Who do you think should get the US men’s national team coaching position? Share your opinion in the comments section below.

About Christopher Harris

Founder and publisher of World Soccer Talk, Christopher Harris is the managing editor of the site. He has been interviewed by The New York Times, The Guardian and several other publications. Plus he has made appearances on NPR, BBC World, CBC, BBC Five Live, talkSPORT and beIN SPORT. Harris, who has lived in Florida since 1984, has supported Swansea City since 1979. He's also an expert on soccer in South Florida, and got engaged during half-time of a MLS game. Harris launched EPL Talk in 2005, which was rebranded as World Soccer Talk in 2013. View all posts by Christopher Harris →
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65 Responses to Time To Replace Bob Bradley But Who Should Get the USMNT Job?

  1. Civrock says:

    Completely agree with Jürgen Klinsmann. He was a fantastic analyst for ESPN, probably the most competent of them all, and would make a great coach for the US team.

  2. Cody says:

    I agree, but what if things don’t work out with Jurgen. Who then? I don’t see many great options. I’m not for a big name with no idea how the U.S. Soccer system works, and the other options (Schmid, Novak, Kinnear, Kreis) aren’t really improvements on Bradley.

  3. Klinsmann would be a threat to the entire messed up US Club system. It would be a shock if he got past Gulati’s MLS minders.

    With MLS getting 1% of US v Ghana viewers, it’s obvious that real change is needed, and Klinsmann would threaten the USSF establishment, starting with a part time President on the MLS payroll.

  4. Phillip says:

    I am 100% against hiring Klinsmann as the national team manager. If he was interested in taking an administration position inside the USSF, then I am behind that decision.

    Klinsmann is very naive tactically, and he was only a success with Germany because of Jogi Low. If Klinsmann is not bringing in a #2 with him the quality of Low, he would struggle to have us qualify for the World Cup.

    • The Gaffer says:

      I disagree with everything you said. But who would you suggest to take Bradley’s place instead of Klinsmann?

      Cheers,
      The Gaffer

      • Daniel Feuerstein says:

        I think Steve Nicol has a better grasp of the US Players than Klinsmann does of the system.

        • short passes says:

          Daniel — I think you’re missing or avoiding the point for bringing in Klinsmann. US Soccer needs to be shaken to its roots. This is not a case of tactics or even roster selections (even though BB’s neglect of Feilhaber, Torres, and Edu was awful). This is all about player training and development of the player pool. We are not a country that just needs a few roster tweaks or a tactical twist. If that was the case several of Daniel’s selections could probably fill the bill. Fortunately, or maybe unfortunately, soccer in this country is at a real turning point. We can go to the root of the problem or we can spend the next 20 years avoiding the big issues and accept our position as a mid-level soccer country. If anyone doubts this, take a look at some of the 2014 lineups for the MNT — same cast of characters, only older.

          • Lawrence says:

            ” If anyone doubts this, take a look at some of the 2014 lineups for the MNT — same cast of characters, only older.”

            Acutally it is: Look at the 2014 projected players, half the same cast only in their prime. (MB, BF, JFT, ME, SH, JA, CD)
            Improving prospects of Opara, Gale, Omar, Lichaj, Ream etc at defense along with Bedoya, Shea, Bowen, Cronin, etc etc etc etc

            Why does US Soccer roots need to be shaken? Because we are building a larger pool of better players and a vast array of youth prospects?

      • SJ says:

        You haven’t touched on Klinsmann’s disastrous season at Bayern. He really doesn’t have too much coaching experience.

        And yes, his best work has come with Loew.

  5. Daniel Feuerstein says:

    I believe Klinsmann will not take the job unless Gulati gives him the keys to the house.
    My picks in no particular order.

    #1 Leo Beenhakker
    #2 Steve Nicol
    #3 Sigi Schmid
    #4 Dominic Kinnear

    Wild Card: Javier Aggurie

  6. DarryLL Vallejos says:

    KLINSMANN OR CHILE’S COACH MARCELO BIELSA
    YEAG JLINSMANN WANTS A TOTAL CONTROL OF THE TEAM….BUT I STILL THINK THAT Jürgen Klinsmann is the best option not only he has a lot of experience plus he knows the US SOCCER SYSTEM!!!!
    SO WE NEED A VERY EXPERIENCED COACH FOR BRAZIL 2014
    KLINSMANN SAID THAT AMERICAN SOCCER LACKS SOCCER IDENTITY (STYLE) SO MAYBE HE IS THE PERSON WHO CAN GIVE US SOCCER ITS OWN IDENTITY.

  7. Darwin A. Vallejos says:

    YEAH MAYBE MARCELO BIELSA (CHILE) KNOWN FOR BEING STRICT, HARD WORKER……AND GETTING THE BEST OUT OF A PLAYERS….
    PLUS CAN GIvE AMERIcAN PLAYERS A LITTLE LATIN AMERICAN STYLE.
    BY THAT WAY 4 SOUTH AMERICAN TEAMS MADE IT TO THE QUATERFINALZ…MAYBE WE SHOULD STOP CONSIDERING ONLY EUROPEAN COACHES WHEN WE HAVE SOUTH AMERICAN COACHES RIGHT UNDER OUR NOSES….

  8. jose says:

    klinsmann would be great but steve nicol would be just has good.

  9. Shawn says:

    I think Klinsi would be a great step forward, but DUNGA is now unemployed and would be a great coach in the United States

  10. blog de mls says:

    I prefer a coach with experience, and offensive style.

    Guus Hiddink
    Marcelo Bielsa
    Van Gaal

    • Cuba Rebel says:

      i dont think ussf wil shell out for guus; on the topic of 2018 we need only one coach, the special one

  11. Cuba Rebel says:

    ok serious name here, hes a proven coach who has won without the best players, has shown he will play multiple formations to fit the oppenent; hes used to handling american players beause hes an mls coach; the man who should be hired is JASON KREIS!!
    rebuttals and arguments are welcome, no need for ignorant yelling though

  12. bigvic says:

    how about hugo sanchez? he played in MLS once, can speak spanish (an actual requirement of the US coaching job up until bruce a.), and his reputation would probably be enough to cut off any exporting of american born talent to the countries of the parents of these young players like rossi or subotic

  13. MC says:

    The only problem is Klinsmann may not want the job. It was offered to him four years ago, but he turned it down. There is no guarantee he would take it this time even it is offered. As Klinsmann said himself the best athletic talents in the US don’t play soccer, they play basketball, football, baseball. And the biggest problem US soccer has is lack of talents.

    • short passes says:

      I agree with your point but I’m hoping that his recent analysis of the US team on the ESPN post game show (I’m betting you saw it) indicated that he was still interested —provided the authority to make changes comes with it!!!!!!

    • Bobby says:

      He wanted the post, actually, and he still does. But he didn’t just want to be “head coach”, he wanted control to change things within the entire pyramid, all the way down to youth. That didn’t sit well with the powers that be and they told him “no thanks”.

  14. Bobby says:

    Klinsy is my choice, but he can’t have a lot of friends in US Soccer after publicly airing his thoughts on the pay-to-play system and the development pyramid. Sure, it’s stuff most of us already think, but we don’t have an outlet like ESPN to say it on. I’m fairly sure some people were angered by that.

    • short passes says:

      Bobby –you hit the nail on the head !! For Klinsmann to get the job, somebody high up the food chain and secure in his position will have to step up to support him. Good luck on that!!

  15. ELAC says:

    In no particular order,
    Klinsi
    Aguirre
    Bielsa
    Dunga
    Bianchi
    maybe, Kriess.
    Permanent erectile dysfunction before Steve Nichol

    REMEMBER THAT THE NEXT WORLD CUP IS IN BRAZIL. We could use a little South American help. Not good time to be xenophobic about our coaches.

  16. rajiv says:

    I think it would be a good idea as long as US PLAYERS ARE TAUGHT TECHNIQUE along with tactics. Such as, passing, game management etc. But klins would be a good idea as far as im concerned.

  17. Damon says:

    There’s no way they hire Klinsman. The reason is it makes too much common sense.

    They will hire Thomas Rongen or Jeff Agoos.

    What other MLS retreads are out there?

    • Daniel Feuerstein says:

      Thomas Rongen has been a U-20 coach, never the National Team. Only as a occassional assistant & Jeff Agoos is laughable. He’s not even considered on the list of coaching candidates, at the same time a terrible Sporting Director/General Manager.

  18. carlos91 says:

    Coach Bradley should not leave!
    he has taken team USA too high levels they are better than ever
    i say we should leave him, because if he leaves we are gonna have too start all over again
    and we don’t want that we don’t want too be like other teams with 4 different coach’s they never learn how too stick too one style i say Bradley should stay!!

  19. Dan says:

    We need Klinsmann and there isn’t anyone that would disagree with that. Then we move on to either Guus Hiddink or Jose Mourinho. Honestly the USA is one of the big upcoming powers of soccer, we have so much athletic talent here that any big manager wants to take the challenge and be known as the guy that made US Soccer a powerhouse

    • Lawrence says:

      I disagree.
      I am so sick of people jumping aboard anything (club/style/coach) with a flashy name.

      Klinnsman DOES NOT HAVE A SUCCESFUL RECORD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Doesn’t anybody get that?????

      You have to have a better methodology for deciding if a coach is succesful.

      Under Klinsmann Germany finished 3rd at the WC, hosted in their country. Is this surprising? Rudi Voller is proven to be not a good coach and yet his German side made the WC final in the term before Klinsmann. Klinsmann’s assistant Joachim Low has the highest winning % of any german NT coach, took that team to the Euro 2008 Final, now marched right over England and Argentina into the semifinals of this world cup. Low also has results as a club coach to back him.

      Klinsmann again had a brief stint with Bayern Munich (one of the best clubs in the world) and had only moderate results.

      I don’t think ANYONE should be drooling over Klinsmann. He is probably not a bad coach, but please… please don’t try to say he is some kind of proven sucess.

      He took one of the best teams in the world in 2006 and scrapped them by Argentina (penalties) into the semifinals at their own country.

      He took one of the best clubs in the world and had them finish 2nd in Bundesliga (thanks to an undefeated end in May with 4 wins and a tie after Klinsmann was fired), and a decent showing in champions league (quarter finals).

      The results of a coach, especially a national team coach, has to be put into perspective. At least Bob Bradley made Princeton, not traditionally a good team nationally, a good team. He had success with DCU as an assistant, and then did well with expansion team Chicago. One good thing about MLS is that there is parity, so one coach can’t look better than the other simply by outspending other clubs (like in europe). Bradley also noticed lots of talent young, when he drafted Bocanegra, Michael B, Ricardo Clark, Kljestan, Bornstein.

      I am not saying let’s keep Bradley. I am not saying don’t consider Klinsmann. I AM saying be realistic about Klinsmann, and the fact that we could get him and not achieve great results.

  20. TGP says:

    Yes Klinsman would be the best choice if USSF is looking to actually take our team to a higher level. Sadly the changes needed to do that are so major that the entrenched interests will not support them. Klinsmann wont get the authority he wants so he wont be the guy.

    It is really a problem that anyone who we think could be the national team manager and take the team to the next level would need real authority over the development side of things. Thats not really supposed to be the job of a national team coach. The national team coach is supposed to take the talent already there and get the best out of it. So we are likely to see another Bradleyesque guy. Someone who does a decent job but doesnt really move the ball forward very far.

    If i had no limits on who we could pay for

    1. Arsene Wenger
    2. Klinsmann
    3. Dunga
    4. Joachim Loew
    5. dominic kinnear

  21. jon says:

    Coming from Germany, I guess he will be a good coach for the US, but don’t expect too much.
    First of all, Loew really has been a big part of the reason Germany performed so well in 2006. Can’t give enough credit for tactically outperforming nearly every opponent (Argentina twice.. for instance). This was Loew, not Klinsmann.
    Second: Klinsmann is a motivator. One thing to consider: He never did the training session and he did not do well as a club coach at Munich. He needs a tactical team to go with him, but I am sure the US can provide this.
    Third: And this is the most important point: Germany’s players are great. Though they are not really taking part of the global marketing machine, since the Bundesliga somehow does not get this, they are (and have been in 2006) not much worse than anyone else’s. Due to the youth development system implemented at the beginning of the decade we already had players like Podolski, Lahm and Schweinsteiger in 2006 to go along with Ballack, Schneider and Klose.
    Fourth: Germany has always done well. The whole DFB (German FA) consists of former World Champions, who know how to win and the players live this up.
    So I guess Klinsmann would have to do more from less..

    • short passes says:

      Klinsmann’s so-called “failure” at Bayern should not be oversold. The team needed major changes which were made immediately after Klinsmann left — 8 players were purchased for over 70 million euros and that didn’t include Arjen Robben who was purchased a couple months later. Another point to consider is that it was Klinsmann who brought in Loew to the national team. Great managers surround themselves with good people!!!!

  22. jon says:

    Oh and by the way.. “counter-attacking 4-5-1″ is what we play as well. And the 4-5-1 is the system every successful team (Spain, Barcelona, ManU, Arsenal,Chelsea, Bayern, Germany) team plays for the last 2 years and it ceartainly beats 4-4-2 (considering equal players).

  23. Michael Farrow says:

    How will Klinsmann solve the problem that the players aren’t good enough?

  24. DarryLL Vallejos says:

    If we want to take the US SOCCER to the NEXT LEVEL we need the best & experienced coach out there….( A LONG PROCESS) can be either European or SouthAmerican…..coach
    Nothing against American coaches (BRADLEY DID A GOOD JOB) but we need somebody who take us there….Gulati has to allow the new coach to make changes in the US SOCCER SYSTEM…MLS IS A FAILURE….(EVERYWHERE IN THE WORLD EVEN IN THE POOREST AND MOST SMALL SOCCER LEAGUES IN THE WORLD….THEY ALL PLAY THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE YEAR…..we dont go by the American style (SEASONS: LIKE BASEBALL, BASKETBALL, FOOTBALL (REST FOR 6 MONTHS)) SOCCER LEAGUES IN THE WORLD ARE RAN THE WHOLE YEAR.
    MAYBE IF WE GET A GOOD COACH & TEAM USA CAN DELIVER AND WIN TITLES AND TOURNAMENTS …..US SOCCER COULD ATTRACT THOSE ATLETHIC TALENTS THAT MOST LIKELY WOULD END UP PLAYING FOOTBALL, SOCCER or BASEBALL…….WE NEED RADICAL CHANGES TO GET RADICAL RESULTS…..MAYBE WHO KNOWS BY THE TIME WE HOST THE WORLD CUP ON EITHER 2018 or 2022 …TEAM USA CAN BE A REALL CONTENDER….
    NOT WE ONLY NEED TALENT BUT first WE GOTTA MAKE THE SPORT REALLY ATTRACTIVE…AND POPULAR AMONG YOUTHS BY WINNING TITLES AND TOURNAMEANTS ….SO HOW WE ACCOMPLISH THIS BY MAKING RADICAL CHANGES IN THE POOR AND WEAK US SOCCER SYSTEM & MLS….

  25. DarryLL Vallejos says:

    I WOUD GO FOR MARCELO BIELSA(CHILE), DUNGA(BRAZIL), MARTINO(PARAGUAY)…..I dont think AGUIRRE OR HUGO SANCHEZ(MEXICO) are a good options plus Aguirre wants to coach in Europe…and they are not attractive to coach the TEAM USA…( there is this little rivalry between Mexicans and Americans in terms of SOCCER…so it not seen well for a former Mexican coach..be coaching the US TEAM..)
    ANOTHER OPTION WOULD BE Guus Hiddink (A LOT OF EXPERIENCE IN TERMS OF NATIONAL TEAMS & WORLD CUPZ)
    US SOCCER NEEDS TO FIND ITS OWN IDENTITY (STYLE OF PLAYING…)
    . Arsene Wenger( KEEP DREAMING …HE WOULD NEVER LEAVE HIS POST AT ARSENAL TO COME TO AMERICA…LET’S BE REALISTIC)
    2. Klinsmann( A GOOD OPTION)
    3. Dunga( A GOOD OPTION
    4. Joachim Loew( HE MIGHT MAKE IT TO THE FINAL OR WIN THE TOURNAMENT….HE IS GOING gET A LOT OF OFFERS FROM THE BEST TEAMS IN THE WORLD …COME ON LET”S BE REAL…COMON SENSE MAN)
    5. dominic kinnear ( ???? I DUNNO WHO IS THIS GUY…THEREFORE…NOT A GOOD OPTION)

  26. David says:

    ANYONE WHO SAYS BOB BRADLEY SHOULD STAY AUTOMATICALLY DISCREDITS HIMSELF/HERSELF. It’s overwhelmingly obvious that we should not keep this same old U.S. philosophy — win with the will, rather than skill. If we are to be taken seriously, and to take ourselves seriously, we have to have someone experienced with world class knowledge and experience to take us to the next level. BB did a status quo job, but it’s time to let a professional take it from here.

  27. Kevin says:

    I think Klinsmann would be great because he is a “name.” I just worry how much of his 06 success was smoke and mirrors. He was a disaster at Bayern, so that is a little worrisome. I love his ideas about overhauling the entire system, but would he be in for the long haul? From what I saw this Cup I think Biesla would be the best choice. We need an elite manager with massive experience and it is sad to say that no American coach fits that bill. I’m not looking at this as a euro-snob (or south american-snob), but as of right now no American coach is “ready” for the US job. It is sad and I hope that changes shortly.

    • short passes says:

      Kevin — Klinsmann’s so-called “failure” at Bayern should not be oversold. The team needed major changes which were made immediately after Klinsmann left — 8 players were purchased for over 70 million euros and that didn’t include Arjen Robben who was purchased a couple months later. In addition Klinsmann introduced a more attacking style to Bayern which everyone-especially their management -seems to overlook. Another point to consider is that it was Klinsmann who brought in Loew to the national team. Great managers surround themselves with good people!!!!

      • Kevin says:

        Short Passes: That is good to hear about the “failure.” I don’t follow Bayern all that closely (save for Champions League). I wanted Jurgen to be our coach badly in 06 and was terribly disappointed that Bradley was given the nod. I ended up respecting Bradley, but I think it is time to move on. I thought originally that going down the Klinsmann road again would be counterproductive, but he sold me again with his passionate talk about what US Soccer needs. I would be very happy to have him as our coach, but I like the idea of Biesla a little better right now.

    • CyberCosmiX says:

      Part of the “failure” Klinsmann experienced was pissing off a lot of Bayern Munich fans by giving Landon Donovan a legitimate chance to start ahead of Klose and Podolski, both German darlings. Bayern Munich in many ways is the German club team that most represents the country, bringing in Landon (and seeing him do very well in a few exhibition matches in ’09) rubbed many the wrong way, and hastened Klinsmann’s departure from the club.

      Many don’t remember that Landon was doing very well until he started meeting so much resistance from Bayern Munich fans, scored a number of goals including multiple-goal games, it is after that time that he kind of wilted. Landon was outhustling and outplaying Podolski and Klose in the exhibitions. ANYONE would have wilted when all you read/hear/see is how you shouldn’t play ahead of Germany’s darlings. Klinsmann STOOD UP FOR LANDON, an AMERICAN, and that is much of the reason he was out.

      I say anyone with the GUTS to stand up to such a storied, long-historied club team like Bayern Munich, to give Landon a chance when NO ONE WANTED HIM TO SUCCEED, he can lead the U.S. team in my eyes. Not just for that reason, but for many other reasons, but that is a VERY IMPORTANT ASSET that we need – someone with enough spunk, vision and World Cup experience as player and coach to lead us.

      So, again, GIVE JURGEN KLINSMANN A CHANCE!!!!!

  28. Zack says:

    Klinsmann is tactically inept (this is the guy who decided to have Christian Lell mark Lionel Messi) and more of a cheerleader than anything. He could get away with this when dealing with a team as talented as Germany, but the USA needs a bit more out of a coach. His idealistic ideas for our youth system would never be implemented either. I could not be less interested in having him as our coach.

    • The Gaffer says:

      Zack, so who would you suggest should replace Bradley instead of Klinsmann?

      Cheers,
      The Gaffer

      • Zack says:

        Though I fear the second-cycle curse, I’d be alright with giving four more years for Bradley. I feel like he is capable of taking the team further than he did this World Cup and I’m overall very happy with his accomplishments over his time as coach.

        Outside of Klinsmann, the international options are slim. Bielsa seems to have a lot of buzz around him, but it seems as though Mexico want him, and he will surely go there rather than here.

        A hire from MLS seems a bit more likely, with Schmid and Kinnear being the most obvious candidates. Schmid I’m not in favor of because he takes so long to get settled at club teams, and he’d have to get settled pretty quickly as MNT coach. Kinnear is more appealing to me. I’ve generally admired his tactical prowess in MLS, and he’s proven to be a master at scouting and developing young talent, something that would be a huge asset as we look to replace nearly out entire starting backline.

        So overall I favor Bradley, but if he had to be replaced (and judging by the tone of the recent comments on the matter by Gulati, he will be replaced) I’d tip Kinnear to get the job.

        • CyberCosmiX says:

          Sigi??? Sigi Schmid??? My god, I would sit just across from the Riot Squad at Galaxy games, they would ridicule him unmercifully during his last season with the Galaxy. Granted, most of it was unwarranted, but Sigi is pretty stubborn to do certain changes, I think the USMNT requires a more open mind.

          BTW, it didn’t take ol’ Sigi long to settle in at Seattle, so I don’t agree with him needing a lot of time to settle in, I just don’t think he’s a good fit for other reasons.

          Dominic Kinnear would be a better choice amongst the two you mention. I’m not sure though if he wouldn’t be that much different than Bob Bradley in their styles. If the US Federation went that way, with Kinnear, I could live with that however I think that Klinsmann should get a try, I REALLY wish they had gone with him in ’06 and gave him the control he felt (rightly so) he should have…

  29. michael d says:

    Yes the best choice is Klinsmann and perhaps he might look into the ODP system and try to revamp it. Based on my experience ODP is a joke, the selection process is based on who you know, what club you are from and how flashy you. The better players who need developing get overlooked and bypassed by the kids who develop physicaly early and then fade away years later. This is the future of American Soccer and we need to develop our youth more efficiently.

  30. CyberCosmiX says:

    Totally, fully agree.

    Honestly, Gulati should be canned – not because Bradley didn’t do an adequate job, which in my eyes over the long-time he has, but because Klinsmann was (and is) a better choice than Bradley and understands just what pressures and realities a World Cup presents for the team. Bradley was probably a great choice UP UNTIL the World Cup, but it will take a more experienced presence to get the U.S. deeper in the tourney.

    Frankly, I don’t want to bash Bradley, but my god, he had a red-hot striker going into the World Cup right under his nose in Edson Buddle, WHY THE HECK NOT PLAY HIM MORE THAN 39 MINUTES! Edson also works real well with Landon – it was a ‘no brainer’ after seeing the U.S. have such trouble finding the back of the net, a no-brainer to all but Bradley. Frankly, the Ricardo Clark thing is not as puzzling to me as not utilizing Edson more, that is the most baffling of Bradley’s coaching moves during the World Cup.

    Jurgen loves the U.S. so it is a great fit. He speaks English very well, unlike some other national team coaches. He also has a philosophy that would fit the team very well.

    DO IT NOW – HIRE JURGEN KLINSMANN!!!!!!

  31. CyberCosmiX says:

    I was reluctant to throw the name out there, but what the heck:

    Bruce Arena

    He has done a magnificent job with the Galaxy since he took over, they were a team in almost total disarray, look at what he’s done – nothing short of a magnificent job. He not only changed personnel, but he changed the entire chemistry and mentality of the team.

    Yes, it’s a been there, done that hire, but Bruce Arena has shown that he has improved as a coach and motivator in the past few years. Like Gulati has said, the World Cup is a four-year cycle, Bruce would come in and start anew.

    Fact is, the US never played better than in the ’02 World Cup, under Bruce Arena. They were fantastic, only a couple of awesome Ollie Kahn saves from getting past Germany into the Semi’s – a game the U.S. really dominated. We showed the best qualities that American players possessed in the opening match against Portugal and in beating Mexico.

    ’06 was a dissapointment, for sure. This is an opportunity though to start fresh, the U.S. team had never looked better than they had under Arena’s leadership. Yes, MANY are going to criticize this, but I’m just throwing it out there, I know the likelihood of this happening is probably 0%, but does anyone really think Arena would have done worse than Bradley?

    If I could add a similar type of circumstance, the Lakers fired Phil Jackson, and re-hired him a year later, only to see him lead them to 3 straight NBA Finals appearances. Yes, different sport, but similar in type of thing. I could see going ‘full circle’ and give Bruce Arena another shot at USMNT coach. Just throwing it out there…

    • short passes says:

      I could tolerate Arena IF he came in with the objective of cleaning up the entire coaching and player development mess. Although I think he’s tough enough and smart enough, he is still part of that system — could he clean out personnel that he has worked with for years? and change policies that he may even have had a part in establishing?

  32. eplnfl says:

    Did I see Roberto Martinez mentioned somewhere for the spot?

  33. Jmart says:

    I’m suprised I haven’t seen Jose Peckerman’s name pop up yet. I don’t think he’s coached at the senior level, but the guy is pretty accomplished.

    If you don’t have to stay within the US, i’d go after Loew more than Klinsman, if only for the fact that he looks so G#dda#n serious on the sidelines.

    If you have to stay in the ‘US system’, then i think Kinnear or Steve Nichol would be strong candidates.

    Bradley’s done a good job, but I think he took the team as far as he could go.

  34. Janderson says:

    I think people need to be very careful with their terms here. It’s all about the players. The US has a pool of talented players, with more on the way. However, none of them play in the top flight at the highest level.

    Look at the final four of the World Cup. All those teams have guys who have played at the highest levels of competion either with their top flight clubs or with their national teams. The top flight clubs are not Fulham, Everton, Rennes Rangers or Hannover 96. The top clubs, give or take a few, are Man U.,Arsenal, Liverpool, Chelsea, Bayern Munich, Juve, Milan ( Gooch has a total of 30 minutes with them) , Inter, Real Madrid and Barca. Besides teh World Cup and qualifiers, the Europeans also play the Euros and the South Americans get Copa America. The US has the Gold Cup.

    So one of our best Clint Dempsey, for example, gets to play a few World Cup games and qualifiers and some Europa league games and some relegation games and he is exceptionally experienced for an american player. Look at Thomas Mueller who already has not only comparable World Cup experience but will get Euro experience on top of his Champions league experience. And he’s a 20 year old newbie.

    Until more US players get that kind of experience on the club level, or the US gets a regular invite to Copa America, it’s a lot to ask Klinsmann or any coach to make up for that experience gap.

    • short passes says:

      I totally agree that it’s all about the players and them getting top level experience — however, I think that you missed a step and that is having the type of players that the major teams will want. And this leads me to the point with which I probably disagree with you and that is in the size of our pool of talented players. While other major countries start out with a pool of a 1000, give or take a hundred. They winnow that down to a hundred or so and then start their process of selecting a MNT. In the US if we’re lucky we start with 50 !!!
      BTW, my numbers are of course SWAGs. I would love to hear an argument that has real numbers.

  35. Tad says:

    England is the best example that having a top class manager means nothing if he doesn’t have a thorough understanding of the culture and mindset of the native players in that environment, under a kind of pressure specific to their culture.

    We all know that England was well-overrated coming in to the tournament. However they had the usual deer-in-the-headlights look they often do once they get on the big stage. Capello suddenly found that he didn’t even know the team that he’d worked with for the past two previous years during a successful (albeit easy) qualifying campaign. He was experienced and wise enough to at least identify the problem when he spoke of the pressure they were under, hadn’t a clue how to solve them… it’s likely that only an English or possibly British manager would. A manager that is intimately familiar with the very unique pressures of expectation that England players are bred and bound with by living and working in the vacuum that is English football media and fandom.

    In my opinion on the whole our coaches are actually ahead of our players in development. I initially had doubts about Bradley but he’s impressed me… more importantly he understands the American footballer. Unless there’s a better AMERICAN option, Bradley should continue with the team.

    • Tad says:

      Further… to my knowledge a foreign manager has never won a world cup with a national team to date. I’m not at all xenophobic. I just think the best manager is always one native to the nation in question, or at the very least with many years experience working with that nation’s players in their environment.

  36. short passes says:

    With the heat of WC competition cooling down it’s time to take a calm, rational look at where the US stands and then decide what is really feasible and needed over the next four years. (1) The US team played its heart out and received several outrageously bad calls but still made it out at the top of its group. However the group itself was the weakest in the tournament, even its premier team, England, was humiliatingly dispatched in one KO round game. (2) With a couple possible exceptions, the team, as a group, lacks the touch and the skill to be counted among world class players. (3) The overly rosy outlook for 2014 is based upon the “maturing” of the current team, two of whose stars will be in their early 30′s and the “development” of possibly 10 to 20 players who have yet to play an international or even establish themselves as competent MLS players. (4) On top of all this, we have a national organization that at best is dysfunctional, and at worst,deliberately works at cross purposes with its major elements — MLS, coaching fraternity, and youth development.
    IF WE analyze this situation and still think that all we need is a brilliant tactician to bring us success in 2014, then I believe we are engaging in the highest level of self delusion. We need a shakeup in the entire structure of soccer in the US and it will not be accomplished in 4 years!!! However, it can be STARTED. If nothing else, our performance at WC 2010 has shown that we have achieved creditability. We are a mid-level soccer nation that can no longer be overlooked but if we want to proceed further, we need to do something dramatic and I believe that to be the appointment of Jurgen Klinsmann as next USMNT. I have no illusions that he will bring us to the semifinals in 2014!! However I do believe that he can begin the process to get us there. We need someone with the vision of what needs to be done and he has already voiced that — improved skills and more ethnic and inner city outreach; we need a manager — someone who will bring in the skills he personally lacks and he did that with Loew; and finally, we need someone with visibility, who will not shy away from the camera and who will carry soccer’s message to the mainstream media. I firmly believe that now is the perfect time for Jurgen Klinsmann!! Guus Hiddink or Dominic Kinnear is in our future.

  37. Katarina says:

    I vote yes for Jurgen Kilinsmann.

  38. Dan Phillips says:

    Klinsmann should be hired immediatley! Bradlwey was such a horrible choice, and did a piss poor job in the WC

  39. Mark says:

    Bradley certainly didn’t do a piss poor job. I thought he did a great job. Saying that I think we need someone who will have the balls to stand up to all the politics in US soccer as well as open up the pool of players. If Bradley is left, Im afraid that he will stick to his main pool of players he analyzed for this WC, instead of looking at other options. I think Klinsmann would be the right guy to do this, as he has voiced it multiple times. This kind of experimenting needs to be done in the next 2 years, not in the knock-out stages of the world cup. No disrespect to Bradley, like i said he did a GREAT job for what he was giving, but 4 years has past, and there is a lot of talent out there that is being overlooked.

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