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Football’s. Transfer. System. Is. Flawed.

chelsea fc 300x225 Footballs. Transfer. System. Is. Flawed.  Isn’t it amazing how long it takes Fifa to put put five words together and then act upon them. Football’s transfer system is flawed and everybody knows it, so why is it only now that constructive action is being taken?

The biggest problem faced by the current system is the widespread tapping-up of players and the lack of either a deterrent or preventative measures. Prior to last week’s transfer ban on Chelsea, little had been done to catch offenders and even when charged, the resultant punishments have been meaningless. A five or six figure fine for example, is going to do nothing to deter a team that regularly shells out tens of millions on their latest acquisitions.

Back in 2005 Chelsea were involved in one of the most high profile disciplinary cases in Premier League history, when they were accused of tapping up Ashley Cole. When they were found guilty, it should have signalled the start of the big clean-up; after all, Chelsea are far from being the only culprits. However, there was no big clean up and not even a big punishment, with the club receiving a mere fine and suspended points deduction.

So come 2009, nobody should be surprised that we are again in the midst of transfer controversy. However on this occasion Chelsea (yes, them again) have been on the receiving end of a meaningful punishment, which providing it sticks, should act as a major deterrent.

Maybe Fifa are finally starting to see sense but can we do anything further? Perhaps impose some laws that prevent tapping up, so there is no need to punish it? Player’s chief Gordon Taylor believes that we should start by imposing a ban on the transfer of anybody under the age of 18.

“There’s been a general feeling that a ban on movement of players under the age of 18 would be better for the game,” Taylor told BBC Radio 5 Live.

“Football is about competition. You can’t have all the best youngsters at the biggest, richest clubs.”

Whether this idea is the answer is up for debate but there is no doubt that football clubs have to start tidying up their act or face the consequences. As such we should all be hoping that Chelsea’s appeal is rejected and that other clubs are picked up on their own offences and are punished in the same manner.

If this is not the case and Chelsea again receive little more than a slap on the wrist, expect those all important five words to be broken up and discarded for a few more years.

This entry was posted in General, Leagues: EPL. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Football’s. Transfer. System. Is. Flawed.

  1. angus jung says:

    chelsea’s current punishment has nothing to do with “tapping up”. the ashley cole incident was tapping up, and was only punished because of public outcry. “tapping up” occurs in 90% of transfers and fifa will never break a sweat enforcing it because it really isn’t a problem. the issue in the current chelsea case is more a question of differing labor & employment law issues in england and on the continent. the real solution, which so-called “purists” (aka reactionaries) will never accept is the novel idea of letting the player decide where he wants to play when he wants to play.

  2. oliver says:

    “As such we should all be hoping that Chelsea’s appeal is rejected”

    Chelsea did nothing wrong. Kakuta’s mum signed the pre-contract agreement when he was 14 and Lens signed the International Transfer Agreement when they could have refused (much like Le Havre refused to do so over Pogba)

    • Lyle says:

      Kakuta did nothing wrong, but Chelsea did. Chelsea simply took the player from Lens without properly compensating Lens, because the boy was contracted to them. Chelsea accepted being fined for their actions if Lens brought it up. Lens brought it up and now FIFA is going beyond a monetary fine.

      Chelsea has been playing with fire, and they’re been scorched.

      • oliver says:

        But Chelsea have been charged with inducing him to break his contract. If that were the case, Chelsea would have no ITA from Lens agreeing to the transfer.

  3. Chris says:

    “The biggest problem faced by the current system is the widespread tapping-up of players and the lack of either a deterrent or preventative measures. Prior to last week’s transfer ban on Chelsea, little had been done to catch offenders and even when charged, the resultant punishments have been meaningless.”

    Tapping up may be a big problem, but FIFA’s punishment for Chelsea over the Kakuta case has nothing to do with it. Kakuta and Chelsea are being punished for breaching contract and inducement to breach contract. This is entirely different from tapping up, and it would be nice if those commenting on the situation were able to draw that distinction.

  4. Harry says:

    this article is poorly researched and generally trite. next please!

  5. usf_fan1 says:

    poorly researched is an understatment….

  6. Patrick says:

    some whine with the prawn sarnies then…

  7. Patrick says:

    Chelsea or any large club: _______________( insert name here) is under paid, and will never reach his full potential as such a small club. We could offer 100x the salary and a chance at playing in European Champions League finals.

    Players parent friend etc: He is happy now, just needs a finely tune his skills

    Chelsea or any large club: We have the best coaches and players tolearn from, and our lawyers could help you get out of his current contract, there are always loops holes…

    Players parent friend etc: well what do I get out of it?

    Chelsea or any large club: I’m sure we could find you a position with one of our friends, and we do need s local in scout in ______________ ( name of players home region).

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